Category: technique tuesday

Technique Tuesday

Today I thought I’d give you all a look at some of the tools I use for sketching/drawing.

l -r HB pencil, 4B pencil, double tip sharpie, Micron pens 01, 03, 05, 08, a Kuretake brush pen, Pitt brush pen, bamboo pen, hunt 102 crowquill

l -r HB pencil, 4B pencil, double tip sharpie, Micron pens 01, 03, 05, 08, a Karatuka brush pen, Pitt brush pen, bamboo pen, hunt 102 crowquill

  1. HB is a hard lead that makes lighter lines when at equivalent pressure to the
  2. 4B pencil  there are softness in between them, and harder leads also.  Find what you prefer.  I tend to be very heavy handed, so I like the softer leads.
  3. Sharpies are great for doodling, and inexpensive.  I like the ultra fine point, but the fine point is great for filling in black areas.  Not archival, if you want that.
  4. The Microns come in various tip sizes.  The ones shown are what I use.  They make a nice solid non varying line, great for technical things.
  5. The Kuretake is wonderful, it is a brush that doesn’t need to be dipped in ink every few minutes, and makes some beautiful lines, as you can see.  Expensive , but worth it, I just wish the ink was a little blacker.
  6. The Pitt is similar to the Kuretake, but his a solid brush point, instead of individual “hairs”.  It has less give, and less variance in the line.  It’s a lot cheaper, but is not intended to be reused, although it can be refilled with some work.
  7. The bamboo pen I bought on a whim, and really liked the line I got with it.  It’s double ended with a fine point, and a slightly larger one on the opposite end.
  8. The Hunt crowquill is an old stand-by, and it starts out stiff, but the more you use it the wider the lines tend to be, so most people use a new one for fine lines, and a broken in one for wider lines.

I, also, use a #3 and #2 round brush for some inking , and various other size brushes for filling in black areas.

l - r Pink pearl eraser, gum eraser, kneaded eraser, plastic eraser, black india ink, F&W Acrylic ink

l - r Pink pearl eraser, gum eraser, kneaded eraser, plastic eraser, black india ink, F&W Acrylic ink


The plastic and kneaded erasers are gentler on paper than the others, and tend to et more use. The kneaded is good for getting into the deeper grooves from my heavy hand.
Those are a couple of the inks I use. I, also like PH Martin’s dye inks, which come in various colors.
So there’s a look at some of the tools I use for drawing. There are others, and I’m always finding new things to use, I find that whatever’s handy works at various times, so there’s no need to spend lots of money if you’re just doing it to have a good time, or whatever

Categories: technique tuesday

Technique Tuesday

Vitruvian Man

Vitruvian Man


Well I was planning a post on drawing the human figure here today, with links to some sites showing proportions/relationships of various parts of the human body. Maybe some videos showing how etc. Then I realized–all this stuff only shows you how one person draws the human figure, or shows some “shortcuts”, which is all well and good–who doesn’t like shortcuts (or is that shortcake)? So this is my advice to you, this is the tutorial for the day. Learn to draw the human figure by drawing the human figure. Find a figure drawing/life drawing session near you, and spend the few dollars a week it costs to take part. If you live near a big city there’s probably a Dr. Sketchy’s near you. If not, even small cities usually have an art club, or university/college that provides these opportunities. Otherwise, take a sketchbook wherever you go, and sketch people in bookstores, parks, wherever you happen to be sitting, and have a few minutes. If all else fails, draw from photo reference, it’s not optimal since photos distort proportions somewhat, but at least it’s a start.
In other words-draw, draw, draw. It’s the only way to get good at it.
Happy Tuesday folks.

Categories: technique tuesday

Technique Tuesday

Another Tuesday, some more technique.
The great John K. creator of Ren and Stimpyhas a series on composition for cartoonists and animators. Here is a page with links to each blog post. It’s a good series, and is useful for fine artists who paint realistically, and illustrators, as well as the people they’re aimed at.
Today I’m interested in one post in particular and his small rant on why todays animations are seriously lacking.

Here is an example of what happens so often in the crazy inefficient, wasteful animation production system we have today. There are so many steps in the animation production process, where about 5 different artists all work on the same scene and each one in succession has to draw the same pose that the previous artist drew, and each time the scene gets watered down, until the final scene is completely stiff and lifeless and has lots its original purpose and meaning…

There’s more. The post is about composing your poses together and having characters interact with each other.
He illustrates with examples from animations, and cartoons/comics

He could just as easily used some examples from the fine arts. Such as:

michelangelo-adam

or a couple from Rembrandt:
rembrandt

Rembrandt_van_Rijn_The_Feast_of_Belshazzar_c1635

See how every character reacts to the others? There’s more at the links above, including negative/positive space, etc.

Free art class–what more could you ask for?

Categories: Art, technique tuesday