Mai-Thu Perret’s “Diana” Surprise – ARTnews.com

The Swiss sculptor, known for giving form to utopian narratives and making feminist fantasy tactile, takes an unexpected classical turn.

Source: Mai-Thu Perret’s “Diana” Surprise – ARTnews.com

MAI-THU PERRET SURPRISED HERSELF recently by producing a quasi-classical statue. Debuting this week at the Frieze Art Fair in New York, it’s a startling object: an updated version of the goddess Diana, standing straight-backed, made in ceramic except for the hands, which are finely cast in bronze. The sleek 5-foot-tall figure wears a sheath dress resembling a tunic, and her feet are clad, incongruously, in sneakers. But the strangest touch is an agglomeration of breast-like lumps around her midsection, a surreal motif drawn from another ancient source: the Ephesian Artemis, a fertility deity.

 Diana’s uncanny quality is not what Perret finds surprising. It is, rather, the idea of creating a traditional statue at all. During her more than twenty years of making sculpture—with mannequins, clay, neon, and other materials—the Swiss artist has studiously avoided conventional figurative modes, preferring instead the messier arena of found objects and contingent art-making, aslant conventional models of artistic authorship.

A viewer with The hundred flowers that come with the spring, for whom do they bloom? I, 2022, ceramic, 40 1/2 by 35 1/2 by 55 inches. Photo Mareike Tocha

Michelle Segre

Mandelas and Nebulas.

Michelle Segre, “I Talk to the Trees” (2021), yarns, canvas, muslin, acrylic polymer, wire, thread, sponges, and lotus root, 144 x 187 x 33 inches (all images courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photos by Adam Reich)
Instead of looking in awe at the latest testimony to precision fabrication, we stand in front of a large handmade object in which craft is neither obvious nor fetishized. What about the fact that the yarn and the loose, impermanent weaving of frayed strips of colored cloth invite viewers to closely examine how the work was made, as we might do while looking at the layered skeins of paint in Jackson Pollock’s “Autumn Rhythm (Number 30)” (1950)? What do we make of the disarray, the unfixed weavings and joinings? I cannot think of anyone else who makes artworks like Segre’s, particularly on this scale. And yet they don’t feel monumental or overwhelming.

More work: https://www.derekeller.com/artists/michelle-segre

Quantum magnets in motion

The Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality combines classical everyday phenomena such as coffee stains with quantum mechanical spin chains in a surprising way. Credit: Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
The behavior of microscopic quantum magnets has long been a subject taught in lectures in theoretical physics. However, investigating the dynamics of systems that are far out of equilibrium and watching them “live” has been difficult so far. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching have accomplished precisely this, using a quantum gas microscope. With this tool, quantum systems can be manipulated and then imaged with such high resolution that even individual atoms are visible. The results of the experiments on linear chains of spins show that the way their orientation propagates corresponds to the so-called Kardar-Parisi-Zhang superdiffusion. This confirms a conjecture that recently emerged from theoretical considerations.

Heart progenitors spontaneously regenerate cardiac muscle via a tight junction ‘honeycomb’ in salamanders

However, investigating the dynamics of systems that are far out of equilibrium and watching them “live” has been difficult so far. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching have accomplished precisely this, using a quantum gas microscope. With this tool, quantum systems can be manipulated and then imaged with such high resolution that even individual atoms are visible. The results of the experiments on linear chains of spins show that the way their orientation propagates corresponds to the so-called Kardar-Parisi-Zhang superdiffusion. This confirms a conjecture that recently emerged from theoretical considerations.

Reading

This week I’ve been reading

Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Panic Fables

The Locked Room by Maj Sjöwall, Per Wahlöö with Paul Britten Austin (Translator)

Also

Rotten by John Lydon (Johnny Rotten)

and A Paradise Built in Hell by Rebecca Solnit

Those last two are bit on the back burner while I read the enormous Panic Fables which I must say started as a bit of a slog, as did The locked Room, which is a murder mystery/procedural that was recommended by someone. It was gotten more interesting in the third act, but I don’t think I’ll read any more in the series. The Panic Fables is just plain crazy. A weekly strip done for about 6 years I think–conceptual comics.

Rotten is about John Lydons life, and Paradise is “A startling investigation of what people do in disasters and why it matters.”